Adrien and Abhinav’s Paper in Nature Photonics

Adrien and Abhinav’s paper on organic phototransistors got published in Nature Photonics. Congrats!!!

Paper title: Charge-integrating organic heterojunction phototransistors for wide-dynamic-range image sensors

Abstract: Solution-processed phototransistors can substantially advance the performance of image sensors. Phototransistors exhibit large photoconductive gain and a sublinear responsivity to irradiance, which enables a logarithmic sensing of irradiance that is akin to the human eye and has a wider dynamic range than photodiode-based image sensors. Here, we present a novel solution-processed phototransistor composed of a heterostructure between a high-mobility organic semiconductor and an organic bulk heterojunction. The device efficiently integrates photogenerated charge during the period of a video frame then quickly discharges it, which significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio compared with sampling photocurrent during readout. Phototransistor-based image sensors processed without photolithography on plastic substrates integrate charge with external quantum efficiencies above 100\% at 100 frames per second. In addition, the sublinear responsivity to irradiance of these devices enables a wide dynamic range of 103 dB at 30 frames per second, which is competitive with state-of-the-art image sensors.

Publication:

  • [PDF] A. Pierre, A. Gaikwad, and A. C. Arias, “Charge-integrating organic heterojunction phototransistors for wide-dynamic-range image sensors,” Nature Photonics, 2017.
    Article
    [Abstract]
    Solution-processed phototransistors can substantially advance the performance of image sensors. Phototransistors exhibit large photoconductive gain and a sublinear responsivity to irradiance, which enables a logarithmic sensing of irradiance that is akin to the human eye and has a wider dynamic range than photodiode-based image sensors. Here, we present a novel solution-processed phototransistor composed of a heterostructure between a high-mobility organic semiconductor and an organic bulk heterojunction. The device efficiently integrates photogenerated charge during the period of a video frame then quickly discharges it, which significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio compared with sampling photocurrent during readout. Phototransistor-based image sensors processed without photolithography on plastic substrates integrate charge with external quantum efficiencies above 100\% at 100 frames per second. In addition, the sublinear responsivity to irradiance of these devices enables a wide dynamic range of 103 dB at 30 frames per second, which is competitive with state-of-the-art image sensors.

    [Bibtex]

    @Article{pierre2017charge,
    author={Pierre, Adrien and Gaikwad, Abhinav and Arias, Ana Claudia},
    title={Charge-integrating organic heterojunction phototransistors for wide-dynamic-range image sensors},
    journal={Nature Photonics},
    year={2017},
    month={Feb},
    day={20},
    publisher={Nature Publishing Group},
    abstract={Solution-processed phototransistors can substantially advance the performance of image sensors. Phototransistors exhibit large photoconductive gain and a sublinear responsivity to irradiance, which enables a logarithmic sensing of irradiance that is akin to the human eye and has a wider dynamic range than photodiode-based image sensors. Here, we present a novel solution-processed phototransistor composed of a heterostructure between a high-mobility organic semiconductor and an organic bulk heterojunction. The device efficiently integrates photogenerated charge during the period of a video frame then quickly discharges it, which significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio compared with sampling photocurrent during readout. Phototransistor-based image sensors processed without photolithography on plastic substrates integrate charge with external quantum efficiencies above 100\% at 100 frames per second. In addition, the sublinear responsivity to irradiance of these devices enables a wide dynamic range of 103 dB at 30 frames per second, which is competitive with state-of-the-art image sensors.},
    note={Article},
    issn={1749-4893},
    url={http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2017.15},
    thumbnail = {https://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~arias/public/publications/files/pierre2017charge.png},
    pdf = {https://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~arias/public/publications/files/pierre2017charge.pdf}
    }